Are the veterans of Virtus.pro unable to play effectively any more?

Virtus.pro, the highest earning CS:GO team of all time, have hit a bad streak so deep it’s beginning to look like the Grand Canyon. We all know the team are still in the game solely because their fan following refuse to allow the team to die a natural death. Just how big is their fan following? Well, these numbers should give you some idea of that…

They have a following of one hundred and eighty thousand on Instagram alone, two hundred and four thousand on Twitter, and over four hundred and eighty two thousand followers on Facebook. This devoted fan following are perhaps the only reason Virtus.pro still get invites to major leagues. They’re seen as a great team, a top tier-team, but their recent string of performances would leave a green team without two majors under its belt looking… lame.


Virtus.pro need to boot the incompetence from their roster

Sure, everyone in the CS:GO universe has known that for years – everyone, that is, but the people on Virtus.pro. TaZ, NEO and pashaBiceps were past twenty five when they were hired. Today, TaZ is thirty one, NEO is thirty, and pashaBiceps will touch thirty in just a little more than a month. But why focus on their age? A look at the stats will be self-explanatory – you’ll see that these three have the lowest stats of all.

In short, they are holding the team down, and are not able to pull their weight. The reason TaZ was replaced was because he had the worst rating of all. They are all below average and retaining them is a strategy for failure for any team in the CS:GO universe. On the other hand, Snax and byali play reasonably well, and do their best to keep the team afloat, but CS:GO is a 5 vs 5 game.

pashaBiceps of Virtus.pro

Image Credit: pashaBiceps

An age for change…

Virtus.pro pulled in MICHU as a stand-in for TaZ, but things didn’t change much. Hiring MICHU just proved even further that pashaBiceps and NEO are little short of dead weight. While the younger MICHU, Snax and byali turn out the kills, pashaBiceps and NEO put out performances that are little short of dismal. If Virtus.pro do not replace pashaBiceps, NEO and TaZ with younger talent in short order, there is really no hope for the team.

Yes, these three are among the greats of CS:GO, and we’ll miss them, but they’ve had their place in the sun, and it’s time to move on, and let younger players with faster reactions and surer trigger fingers take over. Either they go, or the team itself goes with them. However, booting them from the team might not be possible until 2020, because they have agreements that prevent them being booted from the team before then.


How can this benefit bettors?

We’ve all seen how Virtus.pro have a hard time going up against even tier-two or tier-three teams. This can benefit bettors, because Virtus.pro offers a sure win every time they go up against a tier-one team. The odds aren’t great, and tend to be around 1.30 on the opposing team, but that’s acceptable for a sure win, which is what you get every time you bet on a tier-one team and against Virtus.pro.

There’s even more profit when they go up against lower-ranked teams

When Virtus.pro are pitted against a lower-ranked team, you can get very good odds on that team, ranging from 2.10 to 3.30. Virtus.pro do lose consistently, so this is a great way to increase your earnings while this phase of ‘trust in the legends’ lasts. Virtus.pro have fallen from a sixty five percent win rate in LAN matches to just thirty percent. Virtus.pro’s last big comeback was in EPICENTER of last year, where they lost against SK Gaming in an intense final battle – accent on the ‘final’, since they’ve hardly been able to win any battle since. In their last match, they fought against GODSENT and lost the match with a difference of thirteen rounds. They even lost against Windigo, with a difference of twelve rounds. This is really the best time to earn off Virtus.pro, especially when they go up against low-tier teams.


How did the members of Virtus.pro first come together?

Let’s take a look at their core lineup, which includes TaZ, NEO, pashaBiceps, Snax and byali. When this team was put together, these players were already names to be reckoned with in the CS:GO universe. In fact, Virtus.pro’s CS:GO roster was originally formed by hiring most of the players from Golden Five. Kane, Zeus and Edward were all once part of Virtus.pro. Virtus.pro were actually disbanded in 2013, before they started afresh in 2014. Their roster has held steady without a single change from that point on, though they did hire a coach for the team in 2015. The coach has been a permanent member of the team from that point on as well.


Virtus.pro hold three records in CS:GO

Virtus.pro made history when they originally broke the 87-0 winning streak of Ninjas in Pyjamas. However, it wasn’t TaZ and co. that won that monumental victory, but rather the lineup you see in the picture below. This victory took place at least a year before members of the current lineup were put in place.

The original lineup of Virtus.pro

The lineup that defeated Ninjas in Pyjamas twice in a row and broke their 87-0 record in LAN matches in 2013. Image Credit: ESL

Virtus.pro still hold the record for winning the most prize money from the leagues, although SK Gaming are near to breaking their record. However, that gap was originally so huge that even after a slew of wins, SK Gaming still rank second as the team with the most earnings from the leagues. Virtus.pro’s record is even more impressive when you realize that prize pools used to be a lot smaller in the days when Virtus.pro won most of that money. They have certainly won two to three times the events SK Gaming has to reach their record of $2,757,619 USD.

The third record that Virtus.pro hold is rather obvious

They are the longest running unchanged roster in CS:GO pro history. Their roster has remained in place for an astounding four years and five months. Even as of now, TaZ is merely benched, and will return to the active lineup after IEM Season XII. Virtus.pro have won seventeen titles in four years, which comes to an average of four to five titles every year. Their past stats are so high that even today, and after a slew of positively dismal performances, they still look like a tier-one pro team… on paper, that is.


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