2018 Worlds Play-In: Best Midlane Performers So Far

The 2018 Worlds Play-In is over and we have to say goodbye to 8 of the 12 teamps that competed and regardless of whether they advanced or not, all of the teams at the 2018 Worlds Play-In offered highlights and as usual, most of the action revolved around the midlane.

Below, we took the time to round up the best midlane performers of the 2018 Worlds Play-In so far to remind you of the great performances in the midlane this year.

The Best Midlaners of the 2018 Worlds Play-In

2018 Worlds Play-In

Despite failing to carry Ascension Gaming to a single victory, you can’t really fault G4, who did everything he could from the midlane. (LoL Esports)

5. Mykhailo “Kira” Harmash — Gambit

The veteran LCL veteran showed against his prowess on both meta and off-meta picks by playing both Leblanc and Anivia with a 100% win rate.

Kira is one of the pillars of Gambit and when he gets his hands on champions with immense playmaking potential, one can expect fireworks to follow. Despite his mediocre laning stats (6th in CS per minute, 11th in CS difference at 15 minutes) he managed to put out 29.2% of his team’s damage (2nd) and even have 2 solo kills.

These stats are even more impressive when one takes into account that he played Galio and Malzahar in 3 out of the 9 games and the fact that he roams a lot and sets up vision for his team (1st in Vision score per minute).

Unfortunately, a dominating Anivia and Leblanc performance against Cloud9 just wasn’t enough to get the team through the 2018 Worlds Play-In. As a result, Kira will go home with some bitterness, but not without a highlight of him solo-killing Nicolaj “Jensen” Jensen on Leblanc in the botlane.

4. Luka “PerkzPerkovic — G2 Esports

After the overhaul of the rest of the G2 roster last year, Perkz has served as the face of the team.

While we saw G2 post a rather underwhelming performance at the playoffs, Perkz did not disappoint. He very nearly single-handedly took his team to Worlds. He then proved, once again, that was no fluke with his performance during the 2018 Worlds Play-In.

Except for a game against Supermassive where he was “tricked” into picking Akali, his performance in the rest of the group stage was the reason that G2 ended up first.

An average damage of 514 per minute (3rd) and a whopping 9.4 CS per minute (2nd) showed that he can maximize the resources that he is getting as well as his usefulness to the team. Aside from a couple off game on assassins, Perkz dominated the laning phase and his high first blood participation (55.5%) set his team up for success.

Now, heading onwards Perkz will remember his individual outplay on Sergio Cotopaco”’ Silva’s Irelia that led to a good start for the final game of the series against Infinity.

3. NuttapongG4Menkasikan — Ascension Gaming

It might be odd to see a player of a team that did not even manage to snatch a victory in this ranking, but the midlaner of Ascension Gaming did everything he could in order to achieve this.

Ascension Gaming came in with lots of problems and close to no sponsorships. Nonetheless G4 tried to carry his team to an unbelievable degree. He had 38.3% of his team’s damage output and he also topped the charts in absolute damage numbers too among all other midlaners. He also managed to be 5th in CS per minute while the map was crumbling around him and he had a positive gold difference at 15 against Perkz and SuperMassive’s Lee “GBM” Chang-Seok. He was simultaneously providing vision and support for his team. As if this was not enough, he also managed to have 3 solokills on his opponents.

G4 tried his best to carry his team but this was not enough. At the very least, he will have the sweet memory of getting a completely unexpected solokill against GBM, while GBM was guarded by his jungler, and living to tell the tale.

2. Kim “Candy” Seung-Ju — G-Rex

The LMS representative in the group stage fared really well; they had the highest win-rate amongst all teams in the tournament. A big factor in their success was the mid-jungle duo of “Candy” and Anson “Empt2y” Leung Ho. While Empt2y went deathless for 3 games in total, Candy wore his damage shoes and helped his team through the early game with massive scores.

His KDA was 5.1 and in the wins of his team he had a KDA close to 8! He had the 2nd most kills per game, the 2nd largest gold difference at 15 minutes and the 2nd most solokills (4) among all the midlaners in the tournament.

He had plenty of games where he shone, but he must have had the most fun when he played Syndra against Gambit; Kira picked Zoe and after falling behind he could not do anything to defend himself. A solokill 12 minutes into the game (with Kira being at full health) with only one rotation of spells set the pace for the remainder and Candy ended with a clean 8/1/3 scoreline. 

1. Lee “Scout” Ye-Chan — EDward Gaming

Scout was truly the best midlaner of the 2018 Worlds Play-In.

While in past international competitions his decision making has costed his team, in this group phase he destroyed any opposition. He had the highest KDA by far (9.6), the least average deaths per game (having 8 deaths in a total of 7 games) as well as the highest CS difference at 15 minutes (22 CS). That is the definition of smurfing on the international stage. And as if that was not enough, he accrued 14 solokills throughout the games, on average 2 every game.

While we have also seen that Perkz and Candy had good synergy with their jungler, Scout had a higher First Blood Participation than either of them. As you might have inferred, Scout’s performances could fill a highlight reel about the Play-ins. However, the most entertaining game of Scout was in the Knockout stage against DFM.

There, he picked the reworked Akali into the Heimerdinger matchup and the result after only 22 minutes was a broken nexus, several solokills and a 11/0/3 Akali.

Honourable Mentions:

Nicolaj “Jensen” Jensen had some clutch perfomances against both Gambit and DFM but some overextensions of his almost cost his team very dearly. We are sure that in the Group stage he will be able to iron out these inconsistencies and he will be another player to watch out for.

Also, we shouldn’t forget DFM’s KyoheiCeros” Yoshida’s unbelievable performance on Ziggs, where in extremely bloodthirsty fashion, he flashed forward in order to explode the remaining members of a Cloud9; DFM almost managed to beat Cloud9 during this game but still this level of performance of the LJL representatives was remarkable and sets a precedent for next year. 

Of course, while these players have played extremely well so far throughout the 2018 Worlds Play-In Stage, the Main Event is an entirely different beast and it’ll be interesting to see how these midlaners will fare against some of the best that the world has to offer.

Click here for our 2018 Worlds Play-In Stage Meta recap.

Which other midlaners do you think stood out during the 2018 Worlds Play-In Stage? Be sure to let us know your thoughts in the comments down below.

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